DIY How To Regrout Tile and Win a Dremel MultiMax MM20 Oscillating Tool

Dremel is at it again, showing you how to do a project. Then giving one lucky Tools In Action reader a Dremel MultiMax.  This month Dremel and Chip Wade are showing you how to regrout a bathroom.  So how do you win the tool?  Sign up for our newsletter, Facebook or Twitter and you are entered to win. The winner will be announced in next months newsletter.

Here is the project:

Regrout Shower/Bath

Bathroom

Tools Needed

  • Dremel Multi-Max MM20 Oscillating Tool

Accessories

  • MM501 1/16-Inch Carbide Grout Blade
  • MM500 1/8-Inch Carbide Grout Blade

Additional Materials

  • Painter’s tape
  • Dust brush
  • Grout

Project Steps

  1. Insert MM500 or MM501 Carbide Grout Blade into the tool, depending on the width of your grout lines, tighten the screw with the Allen wrench to secure the screw within the holder.
  2. To protect your shower/bath area, we recommend linking the edge with painter’s tape before you begin work with your Dremel tool. You may also consider taping the tile for added protection.
  3. Set the tool to medium to high speed and slowly guide the blade into the grout.
  4. In smooth, even motions, push tool along the grout line to begin removal. Depending on how hard the grout is, more than one pass may be required.
  5. If needed, rotate the blade to get into tight corners – remember to unplug the tool before changing the blade.
  6. Keep the blade parallel to whatever ledge you’re working with, allowing the tool to meet the wall at a right angle.
  7. To avoid scratching, do not allow it to rest on any ledges.
  8. To control plunge depth, use the carbide grit line on the blade as an indicator. Do not plunge beyond grit line to prevent harming the backer board.
  9. When finished, dust off edges and remove tape.
  10. Regrout floor following floor preparation instructions supplied by grout manufacturer
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1 COMMENT

  1. I wish I could regrout my shower, in fact I started scraping out the grout last week but:

    1) the idiot that installed our tiles didn’t leave regular spacing so some of the tiles are butted together, most have too small of a gap to get anything but a utility knife into, and the rest are just barely wide enough for a power tool.

    2) Even if I could get the grout out of most of the tiles the gap is too small and not deep enough for grout to stick reliably.

    3) Water has bee getting behind the tile for years and tiles started falling off as I was removing the grout.

    Ugggh..

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